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Teaching Your Child Another Language

Learning another language traditionally was exclusive to the textbooks, but as a child, this may not be an option. Teaching your child another language can be pretty tough and that is why it is recommended to start teaching around 3-4 years of age, when they have their first language down pat. It is of no surprise that English is the number on spoken language in the United States, but did you know, as of 2019, 61.6% of households in the USA also spoke Spanish? In this post, I am sharing a few tips for teaching your child another language, and also sharing my favorite source for learning Spanish at a young age.

Tips for Teaching Your Child Another Language

Play Cartoons in a Foreign Language

There is a huge difference in learning and exposure when it comes to new languages. When teaching your child, you are focusing on the particular sounds and spellings of foreign words, however when your child is in an environment where the language is being used freely, they are able to hear different tones and inflections in conversations, along with body language, to gain a better understanding of how the language is used.

Try Digital Classes from Home

Sure, an in person class setting is a great way to learn, but I have found that that my children excel when they learn a new skill in the comfort of their own home, without the pressure of peers being present. We love Sarah’s Spanish School for in home learning. Did you know that Sarah’s Spanish School is the most trusted elementary Spanish enrichment provider in the USA, partnering with more than 50 school districts? The kiddos love how interactive the program is as they get to acquire Spanish through stories, games, songs, repetition, movement, and other fun activities such as cooking, dancing, yoga, workouts, and crafts, which are performed in Spanish! Sarah’s Spanish School makes it a priority to promote bilingual education in America, show young students that they can speak a second language, and give schools and parents the opportunity to easily offer Spanish to their students. 

“Sarah’s Spanish School’s founder, Sarah Urban, was a small-town high school Spanish teacher. She used her unique techniques to teach her students, and the response was incredible. Almost all of her high school students were speaking the language and loving the class after just a few sessions. She loved teaching high school, but she wanted to reach more students with this way of teaching and start them at an earlier age. So, Sarah started Sarah’s Spanish School in 2016 in her hometown of Eureka, MO as a way to give this opportunity to “a few” local kiddos. Since then, the program has helped more than 3,500 kids acquire Spanish as a second language in more than 250 elementary schools and online.” –Sarah’s Spanish School 

Sing Songs in a Foreign Language

Catchy tunes and melodies are great ways for learning languages. I remember in my middle school Spanish class, we learned La Bamba. The whole class learned the entire song by heart before really understanding what the song was about. Once we had the song down pat, our teacher would explain the meaning word for word. Because songs often tell stories or describe feelings, it was easy to remember the song’s meaning and therefore the meaning for each memorized word.

Include the Language in Your Daily Activities

Including a foreign language in daily activities with your children is a fun way to further their education on the topic. Time spent in the car is the perfect opportunity to play a little foreign language eye spy! When riding down the road, pick out something you spy and say it out loud in the language you are studying. Have your child point out the item that you have spied. Then, let your child be the spy.

If you like these tips, share the image below on your favorite Pinterest Parenting board.

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